Do not pity the dead, Harry, pity the living. Above all, pity those who live without love. By returning you may ensure that fewer souls are maimed and fewer families are torn apart. If that seems to you a worthy goal, then we say goodbye for the present.

Do not pity the dead, Harry, pity the living. Above all, pity those who live without love. By returning you may ensure that fewer souls are maimed and fewer families are torn apart. If that seems to you a worthy goal, then we say goodbye for the present.

Do not pity the dead, Harry, pity the living. Above all, pity those who live without love. By returning you may ensure that fewer souls are maimed and fewer families are torn apart. If that seems to you a worthy goal, then we say goodbye for the present.

Do not pity the dead, Harry, pity the living. Above all, pity those who live without love. By returning you may ensure that fewer souls are maimed and fewer families are torn apart. If that seems to you a worthy goal, then we say goodbye for the present.

Do not pity the dead, Harry, pity the living. Above all, pity those who live without love. By returning you may ensure that fewer souls are maimed and fewer families are torn apart. If that seems to you a worthy goal, then we say goodbye for the present.

Do not pity the dead, Harry, pity the living. Above all, pity those who live without love. By returning you may ensure that fewer souls are maimed and fewer families are torn apart. If that seems to you a worthy goal, then we say goodbye for the present.

Do not pity the dead, Harry, pity the living. Above all, pity those who live without love. By returning you may ensure that fewer souls are maimed and fewer families are torn apart. If that seems to you a worthy goal, then we say goodbye for the present.

Do not pity the dead, Harry, pity the living. Above all, pity those who live without love. By returning you may ensure that fewer souls are maimed and fewer families are torn apart. If that seems to you a worthy goal, then we say goodbye for the present.

Do not pity the dead, Harry, pity the living. Above all, pity those who live without love. By returning you may ensure that fewer souls are maimed and fewer families are torn apart. If that seems to you a worthy goal, then we say goodbye for the present.

(Source: rons-weasley)


klebekah appreciation week; most heartbreaking moment
So, I loved this entire episode. The writing was gorgeous and spot on, and this, along with Rebekah’s monologue at the end, is one of the best bits of writing throughout. I think that, whether he will admit it or not, Rebekah is one of the last pieces of Klaus’s soul. She tethers him to his humanity, to the person he could have been if he hadn’t been forced to become a vampire. The wooden knight he gives her in the flashback, and that he is shown giving to Hope in the finale, is undoubtedly a symbol of Klaus’s childhood, and in turn, his humanity. It’s telling that he gives it to Rebekah, and not to Elijah. He’s always had a special, unique bond with Rebekah, and it’s the only bond that carried over from his short time as a human to his eternity as an evil and seemingly irredeemable immortal. 
I love this monologue, mostly because it shows undeniably that Rebekah reminds Klaus of what it means to be human.

klebekah appreciation week; most heartbreaking moment
So, I loved this entire episode. The writing was gorgeous and spot on, and this, along with Rebekah’s monologue at the end, is one of the best bits of writing throughout. I think that, whether he will admit it or not, Rebekah is one of the last pieces of Klaus’s soul. She tethers him to his humanity, to the person he could have been if he hadn’t been forced to become a vampire. The wooden knight he gives her in the flashback, and that he is shown giving to Hope in the finale, is undoubtedly a symbol of Klaus’s childhood, and in turn, his humanity. It’s telling that he gives it to Rebekah, and not to Elijah. He’s always had a special, unique bond with Rebekah, and it’s the only bond that carried over from his short time as a human to his eternity as an evil and seemingly irredeemable immortal. 
I love this monologue, mostly because it shows undeniably that Rebekah reminds Klaus of what it means to be human.

klebekah appreciation week; most heartbreaking moment
So, I loved this entire episode. The writing was gorgeous and spot on, and this, along with Rebekah’s monologue at the end, is one of the best bits of writing throughout. I think that, whether he will admit it or not, Rebekah is one of the last pieces of Klaus’s soul. She tethers him to his humanity, to the person he could have been if he hadn’t been forced to become a vampire. The wooden knight he gives her in the flashback, and that he is shown giving to Hope in the finale, is undoubtedly a symbol of Klaus’s childhood, and in turn, his humanity. It’s telling that he gives it to Rebekah, and not to Elijah. He’s always had a special, unique bond with Rebekah, and it’s the only bond that carried over from his short time as a human to his eternity as an evil and seemingly irredeemable immortal. 
I love this monologue, mostly because it shows undeniably that Rebekah reminds Klaus of what it means to be human.

klebekah appreciation week; most heartbreaking moment
So, I loved this entire episode. The writing was gorgeous and spot on, and this, along with Rebekah’s monologue at the end, is one of the best bits of writing throughout. I think that, whether he will admit it or not, Rebekah is one of the last pieces of Klaus’s soul. She tethers him to his humanity, to the person he could have been if he hadn’t been forced to become a vampire. The wooden knight he gives her in the flashback, and that he is shown giving to Hope in the finale, is undoubtedly a symbol of Klaus’s childhood, and in turn, his humanity. It’s telling that he gives it to Rebekah, and not to Elijah. He’s always had a special, unique bond with Rebekah, and it’s the only bond that carried over from his short time as a human to his eternity as an evil and seemingly irredeemable immortal. 
I love this monologue, mostly because it shows undeniably that Rebekah reminds Klaus of what it means to be human.

klebekah appreciation week; most heartbreaking moment

So, I loved this entire episode. The writing was gorgeous and spot on, and this, along with Rebekah’s monologue at the end, is one of the best bits of writing throughout. I think that, whether he will admit it or not, Rebekah is one of the last pieces of Klaus’s soul. She tethers him to his humanity, to the person he could have been if he hadn’t been forced to become a vampire. The wooden knight he gives her in the flashback, and that he is shown giving to Hope in the finale, is undoubtedly a symbol of Klaus’s childhood, and in turn, his humanity. It’s telling that he gives it to Rebekah, and not to Elijah. He’s always had a special, unique bond with Rebekah, and it’s the only bond that carried over from his short time as a human to his eternity as an evil and seemingly irredeemable immortal. 

I love this monologue, mostly because it shows undeniably that Rebekah reminds Klaus of what it means to be human.

(Source: rebekahsniklaus, via ithinkimightveinhaledyou)